Designing Generic Architectures Using Templates

Many companies already have some established architectural design patterns which are supposed to be used in most of their applications. For example it makes sense to standardize the layering of business components. It also makes sense to establish specific rules how one business component can access another one. In the upcoming 9.4 release of Sonargraph-Architect we implemented a new feature in our architecture DSL which should make it very easy to add generic architectural blueprints to a quality model which would allow automatic verification of those architectural design patterns on any business component without having to create a component specific architecture.

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Evolving Sonargraph’s Architecture DSL

Sonargraph’s architecture DSL is now about 18 months old and we received a lot of positive feedback from customers bundled with ideas for improving the language. There are now several projects with more than one million LOC that use this language to define and enforce their architectural blueprint. Of course this feedback is most valuable for us and we did our best to implement a good share of the ideas brought to us. This article requires some basic knowledge of our architecture DSL. An introduction can be found here. To use all the features described below you need Sonargraph-Architect version 9.3 or higher.

Expressing Architectural Patterns as Artifact Stereotypes

There are some basic patterns that are used in almost every architectural model. Those patterns describe the relationships between sibling artifacts, i.e. artifacts that have the same parent.

  • Layered architecture – here dependencies are allowed to flow top-down within an ordered list of sibling artifacts. If we use strict layering, an artifact can only access ist next sibling artifact. In the case of relaxed layering, artifacts have access to all artifacts defined beneath them.
  • Independent – here sibling artifacts are independent from each other, i.e. there should be no dependencies between them.
  • Unrestricted – here siblings artifacts have no restrictions in accessing each other. This is not very desirable because it will allow cyclic dependencies between artifacts, but can be really useful when working on a model for a legacy software system.

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How to Organize your Code

In this article I am going to present a realistic example that will show you how to organize your code and how to describe this organization using our architecture DSL (domain specific language) implemented by our static analysis tool Sonargraph-Architect. Let us assume we are building a micro-service that manages customers, products and orders. A high level architecture diagram would look like this:

System Architecture

It is always a good idea to cut your system along functionality, and here we can easily see three subsystems. In Java you would map those subsystems to packages, in other languages you might organize your subsystem into separate folders on your file system and use namespaces if they are available.

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Designing a DSL to Describe Software Architecture (Part 3)

Connecting Complex Artifacts

After having covered the basics and some advanced concepts in the previous articles this post will examine the different possibilities to define connections between complex artifacts. Let us assume we use the following aspect to describe the inner structure of a business module:

// File layering.arc
exposed artifact UI 
{ 
    include "**/ui/**"
    connect to Business 
} 
exposed artifact Business 
{ 
    include "**/business/**"
 
    interface default
    {
        // Only classes in the "iface" package can be used from outside
        include "**/iface/*"
    }
 
    connect to Persistence
} 
artifact Persistence 
{ 
    include "**/persistence/**" 
}
exposed public artifact Model
{
    include "**/model/**"
}

This example also shows a special feature of our DSL. You can redefine the default interface if you want to restrict incoming dependencies to a subset of the elements assigned to an artifact. Our layer “Business” is now only accessible over the classes in the “iface” package. (more…)

Designing a DSL to Describe Software Architecture (Part 1)

Software architecture defines the different parts of a software system and how they relate to each other. Keeping a code base matching its architectural blueprint is crucial for keeping a complex piece of software maintainable over its lifetime. Sure, the architecture will evolve over time, but it is always better to have an architecture and enforce it than giving up on keeping your code organized. (See my recent blog post: Love your Architecture)

The problems start when it comes to describing your architecture in a formal and enforceable way. You could write a nice Wiki article to describe the architecture of your system, or describe it on a Powerpoint slide or with a set of UML diagrams; but that would be quite useless because it is not possible to check in an automated way whether or not your architecture is respected by the code. And everybody who ever worked on a non-trivial project with more than 2 developers knows that rules will be broken. That leads to an ever increasing accumulation of architectural debt with all kinds of undesirable side effects for the long term sustainability of a piece of software. You could also use Sonargraph 7 or similar tools to create a graphical representation of your architectural blueprint. That is already a lot better because you can actually enforce the rules in your automated builds or even directly in the IDE. But it also means that everybody who wants to understand the architecture will need the tool to see it. You also will not be able to modify the architecture without having access to the tool.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could describe your architecture as code, if you had a DSL (domain specific language) that can be used by software architects to describe the architecture of a system and that is expressive and readable enough so that every developer is able to understand it? Well, it took us a while to come up with that idea, but now I believe that this is the missing puzzle piece to significantly boost the adoption of formalized and enforceable software architecture rules. The long term benefits of using them are just to good to be ignored.

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