Designing a DSL to Describe Software Architecture (Part 1)

Software architecture defines the different parts of a software system and how they relate to each other. Keeping a code base matching its architectural blueprint is crucial for keeping a complex piece of software maintainable over its lifetime. Sure, the architecture will evolve over time, but it is always better to have an architecture and enforce it than giving up on keeping your code organized. (See my recent blog post: Love your Architecture)

The problems start when it comes to describing your architecture in a formal and enforceable way. You could write a nice Wiki article to describe the architecture of your system, or describe it on a Powerpoint slide or with a set of UML diagrams; but that would be quite useless because it is not possible to check in an automated way whether or not your architecture is respected by the code. And everybody who ever worked on a non-trivial project with more than 2 developers knows that rules will be broken. That leads to an ever increasing accumulation of architectural debt with all kinds of undesirable side effects for the long term sustainability of a piece of software. You could also use Sonargraph 7 or similar tools to create a graphical representation of your architectural blueprint. That is already a lot better because you can actually enforce the rules in your automated builds or even directly in the IDE. But it also means that everybody who wants to understand the architecture will need the tool to see it. You also will not be able to modify the architecture without having access to the tool.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could describe your architecture as code, if you had a DSL (domain specific language) that can be used by software architects to describe the architecture of a system and that is expressive and readable enough so that every developer is able to understand it? Well, it took us a while to come up with that idea, but now I believe that this is the missing puzzle piece to significantly boost the adoption of formalized and enforceable software architecture rules. The long term benefits of using them are just to good to be ignored.

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